Seafood consumption is Up

Markets for gourmet seafood markets are now worth over a billion dollars annually.

And, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), world per capita fish consumption increased from an average of 9.9kg in the 1960s to nearly 20kg in 2013.

 

Sustainability is Down

At the same time, fisheries around the world are responsible for declines in populations of many non-target marine species, including fish with little or no commercial value, and high conservation value species, like marine turtles and marine mammals. It is estimated that a minimum of 300,000 turtles and 600,000 marine mammals are killed annually in fisheries as a result of “bycatch”. 

It is estimated that a minimum of 300,000 turtles and 600,000 marine mammals are killed annually in fisheries as a result of “bycatch”. The United Nation’s food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) analysis of assessed fish stocks indicates that the proportion of fish stocks within biologically sustainable levels has declined from 90 percent in 1974 to 68.6 percent in 2013, meaning that nearly a third of the world’s fish stocks are being fished at a biologically unsustainable levels.

 

Transparency is needed

In the US alone fish fraud makes up more than 30% of the total amount sold in retail and restaurants.*

 

Intermediaries blur the source of products and value volume over quality seafood.

 

Data collected on behalf of regulatory entities on seafood catch is commonly inadequate and insufficient.

 

Need + Opportunity

 

Over 30 million small scale artisanal fisheries

Over 35 million people make a living directly from fisheries or aquaculture. And, there are over 90% of people employed globally in capture fisheries are classified as small-scale.

Access to mobile technology and local markets can give fishers a strategic commercial advantage

With the right source verification tools and adequate market access, fishers can capture this market and the premiums that come with it.